Elsewhere: One Woman, One Rucksack, One LIfetime of Travel
Elsewhere: One Woman, One Rucksack, One LIfetime of Travel
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Elsewhere: One Woman, One Rucksack, One LIfetime of Travel

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Author: Boland, Rosita

Brand: Black Swan Ireland

Color: White

Edition: None

Binding: Paperback

Number Of Pages: 240

Release Date: 01-06-2020

Details: Product Description From her first life-changing solo trip to Australia as a young graduate, Rosita Boland was enthralled by travel. In the last 30 years she has visited some of the most remote parts of the globe carrying little more than a battered rucksack and a diary. Documenting nine journeys from nine different moments in her life, Elsewhere reveals how exploring the world—and those we meet along the way—can dramatically shape the course of a person’s life. From death-defying bus journeys through Pakistan to witnessing the majestic icescapes of Antarctica to putting herself back together in Bali, Rosita experiences moments of profound joy and endures deep personal loss. In a series of jaw-dropping, illuminating and sometimes heart-breaking essays, Elsewhere is a book that celebrates the life well-traveled in all its messy and wondrous glory. Review 'Beautiful. A rucksack of memory gems that left my heart sore and full of wanderlust.' - Ruth Fitzmaurice, author,  I Found My Tribe ' Elsewhere is the perfect title for a travel book that is about more than just destinations. It’s about location and dislocation. And it is the sense of being away from the mundane world that makes the book special.' - Michael Harding, author,  Staring at Lakes 'Beautifully authentic writing, full of humanity and gumption' - Irish Independent 'Utterly engaging' - Sunday Times   About the Author Rosita Boland is a senior features writer at the Irish Times. She was a 2009 Nieman Fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. She won "Journalist of the Year" at the 2018 Newsbrands Ireland journalism awards. She is the author of A Secret Map of Ireland.  Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. Pakistan, 1995 Brame – fierce longing, passion. After a few days spent exploring Karimabad, Baltit and Gulmit, I took the nice bus back to Gilgit. Through some grapevine process, Muhammad had known I’d made it safely to Karimabad. He was still a bit mad at me. ‘Crazy! You crazy, Rosita!’ He scolded me, while getting my rucksack out of the cupboard where it had been stored in my absence. My former room was still empty. He carried my rucksack across the garden. ‘Where you go next?’ He looked back at me warily, wondering what new unsuitable plan I was scheming. ‘Skardu,’ I said. ‘Don’t worry, Muhammad, I’m going to take the bus there.’ Skardu, the capital of Baltistan, is 170 kilometres south-east of Gilgit. I was still enthralled by the vertical landscape of the Karakoram, and wanted to spend more time among the mountains. Expeditions started out to K2 from Skardu. I had a vague idea in my head of absorbing some sense of the possibilities of adventure just by being there. My guidebook told of incredible scenery, and villages untouched by modernity. An air route to Islamabad had only been established in the 1960s. The road I was about to travel, the Indus Highway, was completed in 1985. The knowledge that it was only a decade since Baltistan had had a road to connect it with the wider world was somehow intoxicating. This was not a world I knew anything about. Two days later, I was aboard the local bus from Gilgit to Skardu. I had said goodbye to Muhammad a second time, telling him I’d be back in a week or ten days. This time, though, I took my rucksack. The guidebook instructed, ‘For the best views, sit on the right side of the bus heading to Skardu.’ I had duly found a window seat on the right-hand side. Women in Pakistani buses that are not minibuses are seated together, but I was the only woman on the entire bus, which was, of course, full. The driver formally asked if I would share my double seat with a man in a cream shalwar kameez, who hovered apologetically in the aisle. ‘Madame, you maybe permit me to sit?’ he said, bowing. ‘Of course.’ He sat in beside me and at once fell asleep. About an hour after we had left Gilgit behind, the landscape began to change dramatically. We had crossed a

EAN: 9781784164379

Package Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.0 x 0.8 inches

Languages: English